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Greer Fire District

Fire Weather


          

WHAT IS A RED FLAG WARNING?

Have you ever wondered what the RED FLAGS you see around Greer and other areas mean?  Here we will explain what weather conditions need to exist for a Red Flag Warning to be issued.

  •  Red Flag Warnings are issued by the National Weather Service.     
  •  Red Flag Warnings occur when drought conditions, low humidities and high or erratic winds are predicted.
  •  To the public, this means a high fire danger with increased probability of a rapidly spreading fire in the area within 24 hours.
  •  The criteria for Red Flag Warnings varies based on local vegetation type, topography, and distance from major water sources but usually includes daily vegetation moisture content calculations, expected afternoon high temperatures, afternoon relative humidity and daytime wind speed.

 

HOW DOES A RED FLAG WARNING AFFECT YOU?

When the conditions for Red Flag Warning are present you will see Red Flags posted in various locations throughout the District.  When you see Red Flags please observe the following:

  • No Smoking Outside of Vehicles (includes discarding of cigarette ash or butt outside of vehicles).
  • No Outdoor Open Fires (i.e. bonfires, campfires, debris burning).
  • No Charcoal BBQs (gas grills are permitted).
  • No Operation of gas powered equipment without spark arresters.
  • No Operating Vehicles, ATVs, motor bikes, go-carts, etc. off of designated road ways.

 

WHAT DO THOSE COLORS ON THE FIRE DANGER SIGNS MEAN?
Low fire danger level 

IGNITION:

Fuels do not ignite readily from small firebrands although a more intense heat source, such as lightning, may start fires in duff or dry rotted wood.

SPREAD:

Fires in open cured grasslands may burn freely a few hours after rain, but woods fires spread slowly by creeping or smoldering, and burn in irregular fingers.

SPOTTING: There is little danger of spotting.

CONTROL: Easy

 

Moderal fire danger level

IGNITION:

Fires can start from most accidental causes, but with the exception of lightning fires in some areas, the number of starts is generally low.

SPREAD:

Fires in open cured grasslands will burn briskly and spread rapidly on windy days. Timber fires spread slowly to moderately fast. The average fire is of moderate intensity, although heavy concentrations of fuel, especially draped fuel, may burn hot.

SPOTTING:

Short-distance spotting may occur, but is not persistent.

CONTROL:

Fires are not likely to become serious and control is relatively easy.

 

High fire danger level

IGNITION:

All fine dead fuels ignite readily and fires start easily from most causes. Unattended brush and campfires are likely to escape.

SPREAD:

Fires spread rapidly. High-intensity burning may develop on slopes or in concentrations of fine fuels.

SPOTTING:

Short-distance spotting is common.

CONTROL:

Fires may become serious and their control difficult unless they are attacked successfully while small.

 

Very high fire danger level

IGNITION:

Fires start easily from all causes.

SPREAD:

Immediately after ignition, spread rapidly and increase quickly in intensity. Fires burning in light fuels may quickly develop high intensity characteristics such as long-distance spotting and fire whirlwinds when they burn into heavier fuels.

SPOTTING:

Spot fires are a constant danger; long distance spotting likely.

CONTROL: Fire may become serious and difficult to control.

 

Extreme fire danger level

IGNITION:

Fires start quickly and burn intensely. All fires are potentially serious.

SPREAD:

Furious spread likely, along with intense burning. Development into high intensity burning will usually be faster and occur from smaller fires than in the very high fire danger class.

SPOTTING:

Spot fires are a constant danger; long distance spotting occurs easily.

CONTROL:

Direct attack is rarely possible and may be dangerous except immediately after ignition. Fires that develop headway in heavy slash or in conifer stands may be unmanageable while the extreme burning condition lasts. Under these conditions the only effective       and safe control action is on the flanks until the weather changes or the fuel supply lessens.

 

 

For current weather in Greer click here.
For Southwest Region Fire information click here.
For predicted Fire Weather click here.

For RED FLAG Warnings and Fire Weather Watches click here.

For Forecast Fire Danger click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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